15 Quiet Minutes: Intuitive Collage

So far for our 15 Quiet Minutes practice we’ve tried meditation and mindful walking. This time, we get to practice playfulness and creativity by making intuitive collages. This practice is simple, and requires NO artistic ability, so even if you feel artistically challenged, you can absolutely do this. In fact, this process may introduce you to creative abilities that you didn’t know you possessed!

Supplies:

  • A magazine or two that you can cut/tear up (some of my favorites include O Magazine, Live Happy, Yoga Journal, Better Homes & Gardens, Real Simple, Martha Stewart Living, and National Geographic, but if all you have is Popular Mechanics or Guns & Ammo you’ll find something there, too!)
  • Scissors (not necessary if you choose to tear your images instead of cutting them)
  • Glue stick (other glue will work in a pinch, but a glue stick helps keep your paper and images from rippling/warping too much)
  • Blank paper or your journal to glue the images & words onto
  • Any other art supplies you might want to use to decorate your pages (completely optional)

Intuitive collage is one of my favorite creative practices because it is fast, easy, and there is no pressure to make something “perfect”. As you can see from my collage examples in this post, I was definitely not going for perfection! I am sharing some of my collages to illustrate this post, but they are really just for me, not something I’d generally post on Instagram or share with other people. The purpose of creating intuitive collages is to have fun, listen to our inner wisdom, and allow our creativity to come to life on the page.

I created a video of my process of making an intuitive collage, to go along with the instructions below. This is my first video, so be gentle! I know I talk too fast, so sometimes it is hard to understand me—I will try to speak more slowly if I make another video. Unfortunately, I can’t do anything about the fact that I sound like a teenager—young-sounding voices run in my family! (I’m not sure if this is a blessing or a curse!) The password is: collagefun.

To get started, gather your art supplies and find a quiet place where you can work undisturbed. The entire process may take you more than fifteen minutes, so you might choose to tear out images and words during one session, and then glue them down another day. Of course, you can always spend more than fifteen minutes working on your collages if you have the time to do so.

You can light a candle or some incense if you’d like, and set an intention for your session. It could simply be, “To have fun and play with words and images,” or “To listen to my inner voice,” or you could even treat it like a divination and ask a question and see how the images and words you end up choosing relate to that question. I recommend creating your collage in silence, but if you really want to listen to music, try to choose instrumental music. You want to listen to your own voice and wisdom here, rather than another person’s words and feelings.

Now, just start paging through your magazine, and tear out any words or images that catch your attention. You don’t have to know what you are looking for, or why something is calling to you. If you like it, or your attention is drawn to it, just tear it out. You may end up with a large pile of words or images, or only one or two. Either way is good.

Once you have collected your words and images, take your piece of paper or your journal, and start pulling out the images and words that are calling to you most strongly from your piles. Again, you don’t have to analyze them or have a theme in mind, just listen to you heart and your intuition. You can start arranging them on the page in any way that pleases you. This isn’t about perfection or creating a beautiful composition or a piece of art, so let that go. Just put things where you want them. You can glue them down as you go, or lay them out and rearrange until you get them the way you like, and then glue them down.

You most likely won’t use all the words and images you’ve collected, or you might, either way is fine. Just go with what feels best to you as you lay out your collage. As you can see from my examples, sometimes you might use a lot of images and few words, or a lot of words and few images. Some collages will be simple, some will be really busy. Just allow yours to be what it wants to be without a lot of thought or anxiety.

Once you have everything glued down and it feels good to you, you are finished! If you have art supplies and would like to, you can add paint, stamps, stickers, doodles or any other decorations you’d like to your pages, but it isn’t necessary.

Now it is time to listen to your collage and see what it has to say to you. For instance, I created the “live happy” collage below on a gray winter day when I was feeling pretty down. I was surprised that it ended up being so cheerful! But it did make me feel more hopeful and positive, and reminded me to add some play and fun to my life, as well as reminded me that winter doesn’t last forever and sunshine and butterflies would come again.

What is your collage saying to you? If you posed a question for your collage, how does it answer that question? Does you collage speak to any issues or events that have been happening in your life recently? Does it give you any advice? Does it speak to you about something that maybe you have been avoiding and need to deal with? Or does it remind you of something that you are grateful for or some positive action you should take in your life? You may want to answer these questions in your journal.

A lot of times the message of your collage will be pretty obvious to you, but if you are feeling confused about the message, you may want to write a story about it in your journal. Pretend the images and words are from a book, what story do they tell? You could also meditate on some of the words and images and see what insights they reveal to you. The message of your collage may not be clear to you right now, and that’s okay, too. Be sure to always date your collages, because you may come back to them and find they make perfect sense once you’ve gotten some distance from them.

If you have left-over words and images that didn’t make it into your collage, you may want to collect them in a folder or envelope for future use. I occasionally go through my magazine collection and rip out images and words I like and store them in folders. Then when I want to make a collage, I go through my folders and choose the words and images that are speaking to me in that moment. This is how I chose the images and words I used in my demo video.

I hope you will give this process and try, and I’d love to hear how it works for you or to see your collages if you want to share. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions, too.

Until next time, happy collage making!

Supply Notes:
In my video I am working it my current journal which is a Pentalic Hardbound Sketchbook, 8 x 5.5 inch. I love it! It lays flat and takes acrylic paint well.

Another journal that I have worked in and really liked is the Aquabee Super Deluxe Sketchbook, which has a heavier paper that works well with watercolor and other wet media. This is what I use for nature journaling and other journals where I know I’ll want to use watercolor. I also have used and liked the Canson XL Mix Media book, which also can handle watercolor pretty well.

The glue stick I use in the video is Pioneer Photo Square Glue Stick, but really any glue stick will work for this process.

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